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The Expected Expansion of the Provisional Waiver (I-601A)

Posted on by Ruby Powers in citizenship, Consular Processing, Deportation, I-601 Waivers, I-601A Waivers, Immigration Law, Immigration Trends, pathway to citizenship Leave a comment

The Expected Expansion of the Provisional Waiver (I-601A)

By Board Certified Immigration Attorney Ruby L. Powers

November 4, 2015

The Provisional Waiver (I-601A) process currently allows certain people who are present in the United States to request from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) a provisional waiver for certain unlawful presence grounds of inadmissibility prior to departing from the United States for consular processing of their immigrant visas—rather than applying for a waiver abroad after the immigrant visa interview using the Form I-601, Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) proposes to expand eligibility for provisional waivers to include aliens in all statutorily eligible immigrant visa categories, including family-sponsored immigrants, employment-based immigrants, certain special immigrants, and Diversity Visa program selectees, together with their derivative spouses and children.  It also proposes expanding who may be considered a qualifying relative for purpose of the extreme hardship determination to include legal permanent resident spouses and parents.  This has a far reaching scope and is a refreshing positive change in light of deadlocked reform and executive actions being held in litigation all year.

Before the existing and more limited provisional waiver rule was implemented in March 4, 2013, many families had to be separated for 4 to 18 months to complete a legal permanent residency process via consular processing due to an illegal entry or other grounds of inadmissibility. Before the provisional waiver, clients might have been able to stay in Mexico only 4 months due to the generous pilot program in Cd. Juarez, Mexico or in some cases wait 18 months in Honduras or longer, if an appeal was sought and in other countries there were inconsistent waiting times. Obviously, there were hesitations for families to proceed with this process for legalization.

Then the idea of the Provisional Waiver was formulated as a way to allow certain family members to apply for the waiver in the U.S., and prevent waiting and separation times abroad. The concept was proposed in January 2012 and initially opened for Federal Register comment period on January 9, 2012 and again April 2, 2012. The rule was announced January 3, 2013 and began 60 days later, on March 4, 2013.

After the Provisional Waiver program began, the Law Office of Ruby L. Powers has been able to help countless families gain legal permanent residency for family members who only need to remain out of the country for 2 to 4 weeks, sometimes for less time, to complete their consular processing. From fiscal years 2013 to 2015, 74,439 waivers were filed and of those 44,198 waivers were approved and 18,773 waivers were denied.  It was such a success that the DHS would like to expand it to people in all statutorily eligible immigrant visa categories and expand the qualifying member for the waiver to spouses and citizens of legal permanent residents as well.

On November 20, 2014, DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson issued a memorandum, “Expansion of the Provisional Waiver Program,” directing U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to amend its regulations to expand access to the provisional waiver program, to provide additional guidance on the definition of “extreme hardship,” and to “consider criteria by which a presumption of extreme hardship may be determined to exist.”

Currently DHS is proposing to expand eligibility for provisional waivers to include as qualifying relatives, who can establish extreme hardship, an LPR spouse or parent, not just to U.S. citizen spouses or parents, as it currently stands.  This would be in the interests of encouraging eligible aliens to complete the visa process abroad, promoting family unity, and improving administrative efficiency. The expansion of the provisional waiver program would be a welcome change. The hardships suffered by preference category families, who face the same lengthy separation from loved ones when they seek legal permanent resident status, are as equally compelling as those suffered by immediate relatives. Opening up the provisional waiver process to these individuals will offer more measurable benefits to USCIS and DOS, will further facilitate legal immigration by encouraging a more sizable group to come out of the shadows, and comports with USCIS’s goal of alleviating unnecessary familial hardships.                 On July 22, 2015, the Federal Register opened a 60-day public comment period on the expansion of the provisional waiver which ended September 21, 2015. As we see, the previous provisional waiver had two comment periods and took a year of discussion that was noted to the public. In this case, the expansion was noted nearly a year ago on November 20, 2014 and we greatly hope the rule will be in place in early 2016.

Additionally, the new rule may have a more concise definition of extreme hardship, the standard one must meet for a successful provisional waiver.  This will allow legal practitioners to save their clients time and money by telling them what specific type of evidence is required to prove extreme hardship and accordingly streamline the process and shorten the processing times for cases filed meeting the new guidelines. Currently there are only a few cases that hold guidance and a large room for discretion which can cause varying results in the applications and outcomes.

If you may know someone who could benefit from this expanded provisional waiver, although it is not a rule yet, it is helpful to have a consultation with a qualified immigration attorney.  Ideally, learn if the attorney and their firm have extensive experience with waivers. It is important to plan in advance in case freedom of information act requests, FBI background checks, and collection of other documents are necessary. Additionally, in many cases certain processes would need to be started with requisite wait times before the waiver process may begin. In some cases, preparation, research and strategy take time. Once this rule is in effect, many people will be searching for help to see how it could benefit them.

Furthermore, we would like to warn you and others about the use of people who practice law without a license. In Texas, people often called ‘notarios’ frequently persuade people needing immigration legal services that the process is simple and an attorney is not needed. In the process, they are acting illegally by providing legal advice without a license and many times put people in difficult situations that are hard to correct.

The Law Office of Ruby L. Powers has had continued success with waiver and provisional waivers reuniting families from many countries.   I regularly speak locally and nationwide on the topic of waivers and am regularly consulted by other attorneys on problem cases. We have a team with many years of immigration, consular processing, and waiver experience specific to this article’s topic. We pride ourselves in quality service and helping guide clients through the arduous process to a reunification, peace of mind, greater financial and emotional stability and an improved life in the United States.

Update from the NBC on Provisional Waivers – October 1, 2013

Posted on by Ruby Powers in I-601A Waivers Leave a comment

As the NBC staff soon realized, this broad application of the “reason to believe” standard has led to a high denial rate.  Given this development, Mr. Blackwood announced that, as of six weeks ago, NBC stopped issuing any “reason to believe” denials and is suspending adjudication of cases where this issue is present while USCIS and DOS reconsider the current policy and decide how to proceed in the future.  During this time, cases that involve a potential “reason to believe” issue are being held in abeyance, with no action taken on the case; currently about 1,300 pending applications are affected by this issue and will not be adjudicated until there is further guidance on the reason to believe policy.

Stay tuned for a formal decision from the USCIS on whether the NBC will modify the way it adjudicates I-601As with respect to the reason to believe standard.  Expect the NBC’s current approval rate (approximately 60%, including reason to believe denials) to increase.


Update from the NBC on Provisional Waivers – October 1, 2013
By Susan Schreiber and Charles Wheeler

On September 26-27, 2013, CLINIC conducted a two-day training in Kansas City on provisional adjudication of unlawful presence waivers.  The training included a presentation by Robert Blackwood, Assistant Section Director for Adjudications at the National Benefits Center (NBC), who gave an update on the waiver adjudication process at the NBC and answered questions from training participants.  A summary of the information he provided appears below.

NBC Background

The NBC serves mainly as a pre-processing center for applications adjudicated at USCIS field offices, including I-485 adjustment applications and N-400 naturalization applications. In addition, the NBC adjudicates certain applications and petitions to completion, including I-90s, immediate relative I-130 petitions, interview-waivable adjustment applications and, since March 4, 2013, I-601A applications for provisional waivers.  In addition to its facility at Lee Summit, MO, the NBC has expanded to include a new facility in Overland Park, KS.   Approximately 500 government employees and 800 contract workers staff the Lee Summit site. Currently, the NBC facility in Lee Summit employs approximately 550 government workers, and 800 contract workers.  A new NBC facility in Overland Park, KS is expected to employ 400-500 government workers and a similar number of contract workers.

I-601A Adjudication

The NBC is divided into eight divisions.  Division 1 is responsible for I-601A adjudications and   is staffed with between 45-50 adjudicators and 5 supervisors.  When fully staffed, the division will have 6 supervisors, who in turn report to 2 section chiefs.

All I-601As are filed at the Chicago Lockbox, which reviews submissions under its own business rules that address document sufficiency.  If rejected, an application should be accompanied by an explanation of deficiency.  If accepted, the Lockbox creates a case receipt file and forwards it to the NBC, where it goes through its own initial processing checklist.  NBC contract staff goes through their checklist to determine if the application is complete.  If staff determines there are missing documents, it issues a Request for Evidence (RFE); otherwise, it will schedule the applicant for a biometrics appointment. When the biometrics and the name check results come back, the application is transferred to the “JIT” (“Just in Time”) shelves and is considered ready to be adjudicated.

Supervisors assign cases to adjudicators when they are ready to be adjudicated. When they receive a file, the adjudicator first looks for basic eligibility – name check and biometrics response, national security issues – and if there is a “hit,” the file is forwarded to a security clearance team for resolution.  For cases that pass security clearance or do not have “hits,” the adjudicators follow a “processing checklist” sheet, which guides them through the process of determining statutory eligibility (e.g., USC qualifying relative) and whether the applicant has satisfied the extreme hardship standard.  The adjudicator makes notes on the processing checklist, which is helpful in making the decision and for later supervisor review. If the case is denied, the file is sent to the National Records Center, where it will be stored.  If it is approved, the file will be sent to the Texas Service Center.  The TSC holds on to the case files so they can be matched up later after the applicant immigrates.  The NBC sends the applicant and the representative the written approval or denial decision.

The NBC sends the National Visa Center (NVC) an electronic data report on I-601A receipts on a daily basis, so that the NVC can stop processing the immigrant visa application until there is a decision on the waiver application. A “decisions” report is then sent to the NVC every week, to inform the NVC of waiver application outcomes so that the NVC can then proceed with IV processing. The NBC does not send the actual I-601A decision to the NVC; it only sends notification of whether the I-601A was approved or denied. If the NBC denies the application because it has a “reason to believe” the applicant might be inadmissible under another ground, it only informs the NVC that the waiver application was denied.

For the first two months of provisional waiver adjudication, all applications were reviewed by division supervisors to ensure that the appropriate decisions were being made. Now, all denials are reviewed by the supervisor and approvals only spot-checked.  If a supervisor has questions or concerns about a particular decision, the supervisor is not supposed to tell the adjudicator how to rule in a particular case.  Instead, the supervisor should encourage a dialogue with the adjudicator to find out more about the decision recommendation.  If there is still disagreement as to whether the application should have been approved or denied, the supervisor may go to one of the section chiefs for further guidance.

Every week a report is generated indicating how many applications were adjudicated.  Based on those reports, the process is becoming more efficient.  The NBC is in communication and is sharing data with the State Department to determine whether I-601A applicants who were denied were later approved by the consulate through an I-601 waiver.  It is looking specifically to see if applicants denied based on the “reason to believe” standard were found by the consulate to be inadmissible only for unlawful presence and later approved through an I-601. It is also seeking the opposite type of statistics: whether applicants whose I-601As were approved were later denied by the consulate due to a finding of inadmissibility on a ground other than unlawful presence.  After only six months of provisional waiver adjudication, the statistical evidence is not yet meaningful to draw any conclusions on these issues.

If an I-601A applicant who is denied elects to re-file, the NBC will pull the original application and check it against the new application.

Both ICE and EOIR seem supportive of the provisional waiver process because it allows them to clear cases off their active docket where the respondent is likely to receive an immigrant visa.


The NBC has provided the following numbers based on I-601A applications received or adjudicated from March 4 – September 14, 2013:

23, 949 applications sent to Lockbox

17,996 applications accepted by Lockbox

5,953 application rejected by the Lockbox

The reasons for rejection could include no applicant signature, no proof of I-130 approval, no proof of NIV fee paid, or applicant is under 17.  The number of applications received may include re-filings by applicants whose cases were initially rejected at the Lockbox.

The NBC has 12,098 applications in the pipeline, with approximately 2,300 ready for processing. It is averaging approximately 600 applications/week, so it has about four weeks of applications to adjudicate.  With 45 adjudicators currently working these cases, this averages out to each adjudicator handling about 13 applications per week, or about 2.6 per day.  Mr. Blackwood noted that adjudicators have other work responsibilities, including time spent in trainings and at meetings.

The NBC has issued the following decisions:

3,497 approvals (59%)

2,292 denials (39%)

103 admin closures (application returned for various reasons, e.g., filed I-601 instead of I-601A) (2%)

Although applications have been denied for various reasons, the highest number of denials – 1,093, or 48% of all denials – is for “reason to believe.”  The second highest number – 937, or 41% of all denials – is for failure to establish extreme hardship.  Other reasons for denial include abandonment, applicant in proceedings, pending adjustment of status application, lack of qualifying relative, pre-2013 consular interview scheduled, and applicant subject to existing or final order of removal.

At present, the average time between receipt of an application at the Lockbox and decision issuance is 103 days.  The goal is to reduce the adjudication time to 90 days. The NBC adjudicators were working at that pace initially until the “reason to believe” denials became a controversial issue.

Reason to Believe

Mr. Blackwood explained that the provisional waivers working group developing the I-601A regulations and procedures for processing wanted to keep inadmissibility determinations a function of the Department of State, so that USCIS officers would limit their consideration to waiver adjudication. This is because the USCIS has no authority to determine admissibility in a case to be decided by the consulate after the applicant has left the United States and appeared for the interview. In other words, the USCIS did not want its adjudicators analyzing whether the applicant was inadmissible on grounds other than unlawful presence. At the same time, the USCIS did not want to approve I-601As and have the applicant be denied at the consulate for another ground of inadmissibility.

That was the rationale for developing the “reason to believe” standard, where the adjudicators would make a very quick assessment based on the name check and biometrics results as to whether the applicant might be inadmissible on another ground. Under this standard, adjudicators are instructed to deny all applications involving a criminal conviction, regardless of what the conviction is for, when it occurred, or whether it falls within a recognized exception to inadmissibility, like a petty offense.  If  the fingerprint check resulted in a “hit” during an IDENT database search, and it revealed a conviction, then the application was denied under the “reason to believe” standard.  Similarly, if there was an inconsistency in the name or date of birth of the applicant and that provided during CBP processing for voluntary departure after an arrest at the border, the applicant was denied for “reason to believe.”

As the NBC staff soon realized, this broad application of the “reason to believe” standard has led to a high denial rate.  Given this development, Mr. Blackwood announced that, as of six weeks ago, NBC stopped issuing any “reason to believe” denials and is suspending adjudication of cases where this issue is present while USCIS and DOS reconsider the current policy and decide how to proceed in the future.  During this time, cases that involve a potential “reason to believe” issue are being held in abeyance, with no action taken on the case; currently about 1,300 pending applications are affected by this issue and will not be adjudicated until there is further guidance on the reason to believe policy.

Mr. Blackwood noted that if the reason to believe standard is changed so that not all of the denied cases would warrant denial under revised interpretation, the NBC will also consider whether to apply any new policy retroactively and reopen denied cases sua sponte.

While there is no mechanism to appeal a denial or seek reconsideration, the NBC can reopen a case on its own if it believes a denial was made incorrectly. Mr. Blackwood indicated during his presentation that denials under the reason to believe standard that seem clearly wrong could be brought to his attention and he would pull the file to see if the agency made a mistake.  The examples he gave where the standard might have been misapplied include cases where the applicant’s name and date of birth appear inconsistently in DHS data files, but the inconsistency appears to be a clerical error or insignificant.  It would not include cases containing criminal convictions, since the agency is waiting for further instruction before reviewing those.  To bring those cases to his attention, send an e-mail to the authors at or  Include the name of the applicant, the waiver receipt number, and the “A” number, as well as a brief description of the issue (e.g., month and day of applicant’s date of birth were transposed; applicant’s name recorded incorrectly).

Adjudication of Extreme Hardship and RFEs

Current policy does not mandate that the agency issue an Request for Evidence (RFE) before issuing a denial.  NBC adjudicators will typically issue an RFE if they believe additional documentation will help them reach a decision in a case.  For example, if an applicant claims a health-related hardship, but only submits financial evidence, the adjudicator will issue an RFE.  Or if the applicant claims multiple hardships but submits only evidence supporting one claimed hardship, or weak evidence of hardship, the adjudicator will issue an RFE for the additional evidence.  But if the applicant claims hardship and the officer believes sufficient evidence was presented but that the extreme hardship standard was not met, then the adjudicator can simply issue a denial without issuing an RFE.  In other words, if additional documentation would not add any value to the hardship claim, the NBC will forego issuance of an RFE.  Mr. Blackwood noted that quality control measures are in place because all denials are reviewed by a supervisor.

Mr. Blackwood explained that RFE response times are set at 30 days so that consular processing is not delayed.  A request for an extension may be considered if there are compelling reasons warranting additional time to respond to the RFE

Comparison with NSC Adjudications of I-601

NBC staff made adjustments to their standards for evaluating extreme hardship that has resulted in more provisional waiver approvals. These adjustments came in the wake of exchanging information and statistical data with the NSC regarding its adjudication of I-601 waivers, as well as reviewing AAO waiver denial reversals.  Mr. Blackwood explained that adjudicators are now assessing extreme hardship to the qualifying relative as impacted by hardships to other family members. As a result, the denial rate has come down and the NBC is approving more applications.  Mr. Blackwood anticipates that the denial rate will continue to go down as adjudicators gain more experience.

Mr. Blackwood also noted that the provisional waiver is more challenging for the applicant, because the hardship to the qualifying relative is prospective, as opposed to the I-601 applicant who has left the United States and whose qualifying relative is already experiencing the hardship.  For this reason, the denial rates will not necessarily be comparable.

Waiver Submission Format 

Mr. Blackwood encourages applicants to submit a cover letter or brief that summarizes the hardships and helps the adjudicator understand the theory of the case. Submit all supporting evidence that is pertinent, such as a doctor’s letter summarizing medical conditions.  Since the Lockbox removes all tabs and bindings, use some kind of pagination system to help identify and segregate supporting documentation.  Even though the application is scanned at the Lockbox, the original submission is still sent to the NBC; any highlighting of important documentation or color dividers separating exhibits will be retained.  If submitting supplemental information after the application has already been submitted, make sure to include the receipt number and the A#.   Avoid sending multiple pages from the Internet on a specific medical condition (e.g., definition of diabetes) or DOS country conditions reports.


Stay tuned for a formal decision from the USCIS on whether the NBC will modify the way it adjudicates I-601As with respect to the reason to believe standard.  Expect the NBC’s current approval rate (approximately 60%, including reason to believe denials) to increase.

Six Things You Need to Know about Stateside Processing of I-601A Waivers

Posted on by Ruby Powers in Consular Processing, I-601A Waivers, Immigration Law, Immigration Trends, Legislative Reform Leave a comment

Author: Laura Lichter on 01/04/2013


Starting March 4, 2013, certain relatives of American citizens who are in the country illegally and need a waiver of unlawful presence before being eligible for a green card can get a decision on their casebefore leaving the United States.

For those who can take advantage of the new rule, this means peace of mind, knowing that their loved one is likely to successfully complete the immigration process and not be stranded in a foreign country for an unknown length of time.  For some, however, the new rule will do nothing to resolve their immigration issues.

1.      What is the new rule and how can it help my family?

Under current law, many immigrants who enter the country illegally or overstay their visas cannot apply for permanent residence (a “green card”) in the U.S., and instead must finish the immigration process abroad.  Unfortunately, just leaving the country—even to pick up a visa sponsored by a family member—automatically makes the intending immigrant subject to a penalty for their “unlawful presence,” potentially separating them from their family for up to ten years.

For some, but not all, the penalty can be waived.  Before this new rule, immigrants could be stranded outside the country for weeks, months or even years while waiting for a decision on whether they could return to their life in the United States. And all that time, the immigrant was stuck abroad, usually with no legal way to return.  Many families endured the emotional strain, financial hardship and dangerous conditions. Others simply were unwilling to take the risk.

The new rule means that many immigrants will leave the United States, knowing in advance that their case will probably be approved, and they could be back with their families—as a legal resident—in a matter of days.

2.      Who can apply under the new rule?

Only applicants who are an immediate relative of a US citizen (spouses, parents and certain children) can apply at this time, though the rule may later be expanded to other relatives.

The applicant must be physically present in the United States, and not already have a scheduled interview at a U.S. consulate abroad.  Also, the provisional waiver is only available if the sole issue holding up a case is unlawful presence.  Applicants who have criminal issues or other immigration violations cannot use the provisional procedure.

Individuals who are in immigration court or who have an order of removal or voluntary departure may not qualify unless they get special permission from the government and a court order resolving their case.

To be successful, applicants must show that denying the case would be an extreme hardship to their qualifying relative(s); the impact on the immigrant doesn’t count.  Hardship factors can include family separation, economic hardship, medical issues, country conditions abroad, and any other difficulty or harm faced by the qualifying relative(s), if the waiver isn’t granted.

3.      What does it mean that the waiver is “provisional?”

Even if a waiver is granted, the approval is “provisional.”  As a practical matter, this means that the government has reviewed the case and believes that the waiver should be granted, but there is no guarantee that a case will be successful if facts change or new information comes to light.  For example, if an applicant had previous immigration violations or criminal history, the provisional waiver will be revoked.

If any new issues arise, and the applicant is still eligible for a waiver, he or she will be able to re-apply using the existing process, but will have to wait abroad for a decision on their case.

4.      When can I apply?

The new rule goes into effect on March 4, 2013, and no filings will be accepted before that date. You can only apply for a provisional waiver after an immigrant petition has been approved.  If you haven’t filed yet or you’re still waiting for a decision on a pending petition, you can’t apply for the provisional waiver—yet.

5.      What else do I need to know about provisional waivers?

A provisional waiver is not a legal status, and even an approved waiver doesn’t provide work authorization, a social security number or a driver’s license. Having a provisional waiver will not protect you from deportation or any other consequences of being in the country illegally.

If an application for a provisional waiver is denied, there is no appeal.  If you have more or better evidence to prove your case, you can re-file, with a new filing fee. Remember, not everyone can be sponsored or qualify for a waiver, and just as importantly, not everyoneneeds a waiver.

6.      Do I need to work with an attorney?

The immigration process can take months, even years, and government filing fees and other expenses are significant—it’s best to know your options before investing time and money.  A thorough legal consultation should look at all aspects of your immigration history to find the best solution for your family, not just evaluate eligibility for a provisional waiver.

Always work with a licensed immigration attorney.  Never trust legal advice from an unregulated consultant or notario. Consider consulting with an experienced immigration lawyer before starting the process to make sure that you qualify, and that stateside waiver processing is the best solution for your immigration case.

Additional Resources

Always turn to reputable sources for immigration advice and information about new developments. Finding an AILA lawyer is a good place to start. Members listed on meet legal education and malpractice insurance requirements, and have been AILA members for at least two years.

AILA Immigration Lawyer Referral Service

AILA Resources for Stateside Waivers

USCIS Resources on Provisional Waivers

Consumer Protection for Victims of Immigration or Notario Fraud

Written by Laura Lichter, AILA President


Posted on by Ruby Powers in Consular Processing, I-601 Waivers, I-601A Waivers, Immigration Law, Immigration or Notario Fraud, Immigration Trends, Processing of Applications and Petitions 1 Comment

By Ruby L. Powers – Provisional Waiver Attorney – January 4, 2013

  1. Final rule published January 3, 2013 and USCIS will start accepting I-601A waiver (provisional waivers) on March 4, 2013
  2. Only applies if the applicant’s qualifying relative is a US citizen spouse or parent.
  3. Only applied if the applicant’s ground of inadmissibility will be unlawful presence.
  4. Applicants still have to leave the US to follow through with the consular processing and waiver. Please note: this rule doesn’t keep the applicant from leaving and triggering a bar but it does diminish the time abroad.
  5. As per the form and instructions, applicants can apply for the provisional waiver more than once.
  6. If an applicant is at the National Visa Center stage, they must notify NVC of plans to apply for the provisional waiver rule.  One must notify the NVC as soon as the fee bills have been paid, by emailing
  7. If an applicant has had a visa interview scheduled, to be able to still submit a provisional waiver a new visa petition ( a new I-130) must be filed and one must ask the Consulate to cancel the registration of the previous immigrant visa case.
  8. If an applicant is in removal proceedings,  has their case administratively closed, has no calendared hearing in the future,  AND otherwise qualify, an applicant can submit a provisional waiver
  9. Only USCIS can adjudicate the I-601A waiver (not immigration court)
  10. An applicant should only file a provisional waiver if they don’t have any criminal history that would make them inadmissible. Therefore, one must consult with an immigration attorney if the applicant has any criminal history and wants to pursue this.
  11. After the I-601A waiver is approved, it is expected that the visa appointment in the applicant’s home country will be 2-3 months afterwards.
  12. If the Consulate at the visa appointment determines the applicant has other grounds of inadmissibility, an approved provisional waiver is automatically revoked.


The Law Office of Ruby L. Powers is located in Houston, Texas helping clients around the US and world with their US Federal Immigration needs.
Please beware of ‘notarios’ unlawfully practicing law as it is illegal and they often do not suffer the consequences of their actions as much as the applicants do who use them. The author sees this time and time again via her legal consultations with clients who have cases made more difficult to solve by notario actions.Immigration attorneys and immigrants are grateful for this opportunity by DHS!



  1. La norma final fue publicada el 3 de Enero del 2013 y el USCIS comenzara a aceptar el perdón I-610A (perdón provisional) el 4 de Marzo del 2013. 
  2. Este perdón solo aplica si el pariente calificado (madre, padre o esposo(a)) es ciudadano(a) American(a).
  3. Este perdón solo aplica si el motivo de inadmisibilidad del cliente es la presencia ilegal.
  4. Los solicitantes deben salir de los EE.UU. para seguir adelante con el proceso consular y perdón. Nota: esta regla no impide que al quitar el país se active el “bar” por haber residido en este ilegalmente pero si disminuye el tiempo que el solicitante debe estar en el extranjero.
  5. De acuerdo con el formulario y sus instrucciones, los aspirantes pueden solicitar el perdón provisional más de una vez.
  6. Si el solicitante se encuentra en la fase de Centro Nacional de Visas, este debe notificar al CNV sobre sus planes de aplicar al perdón provisional. Se debe notificar al CNV tan pronto como las cuotas hayan sido pagadas, por correo electrónico a
  7. Si el solicitante ya tiene una entrevista programada, este deberá presentar una nueva solicitud de visa (una I-130 nueva) para poder solicitar el perdón provisional, así como pedir al Consulado cancelar cualquier petición de visa previa.
  8. Si el solicitante se encuentra en proceso de deportación, tiene un caso admirativamente cerrado, no tiene una audiencia programada en el futuro, y califica de otra manera, este puede aplicar a un perdón provisional.
  9. Solo USCIS puede adjudicar el perdón I-601A (no la corte de inmigración).
  10. El solicitante debe presentar una exención provisional solamente si no tiene antecedentes penales que lo harían de otra forma inadmisible. Por lo tanto, se debe consultar con un abogado de inmigración si el solicitante tiene antecedentes penales y quiere continuar con el proceso.
  11. Una vez que el perdón I.601A sea aprobado, se espera que la cita para la visa sea programada para 2 o 3 meses después en el país de origen del solicitante.
  12. Si el Consulado, en la cita para la visa, determina que existen otros motivos para la inadmisibilidad del solicitante, el perdón provisional aprobado es automáticamente revocado.

 Escrito por Ruby L. Powers, Abogada de I-601A/ Perdón Provisional

Oficina Jurídica de  Ruby L. Powers

Houston, Texas ayudando a clientes alrededor de los EE.UU. y el mundo con sus necesidades Migratorias Federales en los Estados Unidos.




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