NEWS RELEASE: ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE SHUTS DOWN FRAUDULENT “NOTARIOS” AND UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRATION CONSULTANTS IN SOUTH TEXAS

Posted on by Ruby Powers in Immigration Law, Immigration or Notario Fraud Leave a comment

NEWS RELEASE: ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE SHUTS DOWN FRAUDULENT “NOTARIOS” AND UNAUTHORIZED IMMIGRATION CONSULTANTS IN SOUTH TEXAS

Posted on May 31, 2013
For the original OAG press release, with links to court documents in the cases mentioned below, please visit: https://www.oag.state.tx.us/oagNews/release.php?id=4413

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 29, 2013
www.texasattorneygeneral.gov CONTACT
Press Office at
(512) 463-2050
Attorney General’s Office Shuts Down Fraudulent “Notarios” and Unauthorized Immigration Consultants in South Texas

State secures judgments that permanently shut down three unlawful firms operated by “notarios”

MCALLEN – Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott announced today that he has shut down three fraudulent “notario” operations in the Rio Grande Valley.
A Hidalgo County district court granted the State’s request and issued permanent and temporary injunctions against the following four defendants:
• Veronica G. Garcia and Cecilia H. Solis, doing business as Garcia & Solis Services (permanent injunction);
• Ana Isabel Lumbreras, doing business as Montemayor Services (permanent injunction);
• Marilia Luz, doing business as Immigration Help (permanent injunction);
• Jairo Romanovich, doing business as Romanovich Charitable Service Inc. (temporary injunction).

Earlier this month, the State filed separate enforcement actions against the four defendants and charged each of them with violating the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act (DTPA) and the Notary Public Act. At the State’s request, a Hidalgo County district court ordered the four defendants to pay civil penalties for unlawfully representing that they were legally authorized to process immigration cases before federal authorities. During the discovery process, state investigators discovered that the defendants were neither licensed attorneys nor accredited to offer immigration-related legal services.

Under federal law, only licensed attorneys and organizations accredited by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Board of Immigration Appeals may offer immigration consulting services.Texas law authorizes notaries public to witness the signing of legal documents – but specifically forbids them from providing immigration services unless they hold a separate license to practice law. Scam artists have long exploited the misunderstanding between the term “notary” and the similar-sounding Spanish term “notario público,” which is used in Latin America to describe highly experienced, specialized attorneys.

The State’s cases against the four defendants were part of the Office of the Attorney General’s (OAG) month-long crackdown on immigration scams in Hidalgo County. The OAG’s case against Jairo Romanovich – doing business as Romanovich Charitable Service Inc. – remains pending. On May 21, a Hidalgo County district court granted the State’s request for a temporary restraining order stopping Romanovich and his firm from offering unauthorized immigration-related legal services.

Since assuming office in 2002, Attorney General Abbott has shut down more than 75 businesses for providing unauthorized legal services. Former or current clients of an unauthorized legal services provider should file a complaint with the Attorney General’s Office at (800) 252-8011 or online at www.texasattorneygeneral.gov.

FOR OTHER ITEMS ASSOCIATED WITH ATTORNEY GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS, ACCESS OAG NEWS RELEASES ONLINE ATWWW.TEXASATTORNEYGENERAL.GOV.

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TOP 12 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE PROVISIONAL WAIVER RULE – I-601A WAIVER

Posted on by Ruby Powers in Consular Processing, I-601 Waivers, I-601A Waivers, Immigration Law, Immigration or Notario Fraud, Immigration Trends, Processing of Applications and Petitions 1 Comment

By Ruby L. Powers – Provisional Waiver Attorney – January 4, 2013

  1. Final rule published January 3, 2013 and USCIS will start accepting I-601A waiver (provisional waivers) on March 4, 2013
  2. Only applies if the applicant’s qualifying relative is a US citizen spouse or parent.
  3. Only applied if the applicant’s ground of inadmissibility will be unlawful presence.
  4. Applicants still have to leave the US to follow through with the consular processing and waiver. Please note: this rule doesn’t keep the applicant from leaving and triggering a bar but it does diminish the time abroad.
  5. As per the form and instructions, applicants can apply for the provisional waiver more than once.
  6. If an applicant is at the National Visa Center stage, they must notify NVC of plans to apply for the provisional waiver rule.  One must notify the NVC as soon as the fee bills have been paid, by emailing NVCi601a@state.gov.
  7. If an applicant has had a visa interview scheduled, to be able to still submit a provisional waiver a new visa petition ( a new I-130) must be filed and one must ask the Consulate to cancel the registration of the previous immigrant visa case.
  8. If an applicant is in removal proceedings,  has their case administratively closed, has no calendared hearing in the future,  AND otherwise qualify, an applicant can submit a provisional waiver
  9. Only USCIS can adjudicate the I-601A waiver (not immigration court)
  10. An applicant should only file a provisional waiver if they don’t have any criminal history that would make them inadmissible. Therefore, one must consult with an immigration attorney if the applicant has any criminal history and wants to pursue this.
  11. After the I-601A waiver is approved, it is expected that the visa appointment in the applicant’s home country will be 2-3 months afterwards.
  12. If the Consulate at the visa appointment determines the applicant has other grounds of inadmissibility, an approved provisional waiver is automatically revoked.

 

The Law Office of Ruby L. Powers is located in Houston, Texas helping clients around the US and world with their US Federal Immigration needs.
Please beware of ‘notarios’ unlawfully practicing law as it is illegal and they often do not suffer the consequences of their actions as much as the applicants do who use them. The author sees this time and time again via her legal consultations with clients who have cases made more difficult to solve by notario actions.Immigration attorneys and immigrants are grateful for this opportunity by DHS!

——-

LAS 12 COSAS MAS IMPORTANTES QUE DEBE SABER SOBRE LA REGLA DE PERDON PROVISIONAL – PERDON 1-601A

  1. La norma final fue publicada el 3 de Enero del 2013 y el USCIS comenzara a aceptar el perdón I-610A (perdón provisional) el 4 de Marzo del 2013. 
  2. Este perdón solo aplica si el pariente calificado (madre, padre o esposo(a)) es ciudadano(a) American(a).
  3. Este perdón solo aplica si el motivo de inadmisibilidad del cliente es la presencia ilegal.
  4. Los solicitantes deben salir de los EE.UU. para seguir adelante con el proceso consular y perdón. Nota: esta regla no impide que al quitar el país se active el “bar” por haber residido en este ilegalmente pero si disminuye el tiempo que el solicitante debe estar en el extranjero.
  5. De acuerdo con el formulario y sus instrucciones, los aspirantes pueden solicitar el perdón provisional más de una vez.
  6. Si el solicitante se encuentra en la fase de Centro Nacional de Visas, este debe notificar al CNV sobre sus planes de aplicar al perdón provisional. Se debe notificar al CNV tan pronto como las cuotas hayan sido pagadas, por correo electrónico a NVCi610@state.gov.
  7. Si el solicitante ya tiene una entrevista programada, este deberá presentar una nueva solicitud de visa (una I-130 nueva) para poder solicitar el perdón provisional, así como pedir al Consulado cancelar cualquier petición de visa previa.
  8. Si el solicitante se encuentra en proceso de deportación, tiene un caso admirativamente cerrado, no tiene una audiencia programada en el futuro, y califica de otra manera, este puede aplicar a un perdón provisional.
  9. Solo USCIS puede adjudicar el perdón I-601A (no la corte de inmigración).
  10. El solicitante debe presentar una exención provisional solamente si no tiene antecedentes penales que lo harían de otra forma inadmisible. Por lo tanto, se debe consultar con un abogado de inmigración si el solicitante tiene antecedentes penales y quiere continuar con el proceso.
  11. Una vez que el perdón I.601A sea aprobado, se espera que la cita para la visa sea programada para 2 o 3 meses después en el país de origen del solicitante.
  12. Si el Consulado, en la cita para la visa, determina que existen otros motivos para la inadmisibilidad del solicitante, el perdón provisional aprobado es automáticamente revocado.

 Escrito por Ruby L. Powers, Abogada de I-601A/ Perdón Provisional

Oficina Jurídica de  Ruby L. Powers

Houston, Texas ayudando a clientes alrededor de los EE.UU. y el mundo con sus necesidades Migratorias Federales en los Estados Unidos.

 

 


Immigration attorneys ‘bombarded’ after Obama policy announcement

Posted on by Ruby Powers in DREAM Act, Immigration Law, Immigration or Notario Fraud, Immigration Trends, Legislative Reform Leave a comment

“It is important that people not do anything until it is clear what the actual process is to apply,” Abdin said. “We don’t want them to fall prey to notaries or attorneys who are only after money and are not really going to be helping them.”

Abdin and other immigration attorneys urged undocumented immigrants hoping to qualify under the policy to start gathering paperwork that would prove they meet the requirements outlined by the government, such as birth certificates, passports, Texas or consular IDs, school or vaccination records.

More..


Chris LaRiche seduces immigrants with lies

Posted on by Ruby Powers in Immigration or Notario Fraud, Immigration Trends Leave a comment

Please be careful of ‘notarios’ because they are not lawyers and there is more to immigration than just ‘filling out forms.’  After a client has worked with a notario, it often difficult to fix the mistakes they have made.

I-601 Waiver Attorney, Ruby L. Powers

Link here – Full Article

Chris LaRiche seduces immigrants with lies

He offered empty promises but had secrets of his own

A A A Comments (6) By Gregory Pratt Wednesday, Jan 11 2012

 

Patrick Faricy

Patricia Cabrera came to the Fifth Street Towers in search of immigration papers. Cabrera had been listening to La Invasora radio when she heard an advertisement that seized her attention.

 

Hennepin County Sherriff

 

B FRESH Photography and Media

Silvia Sibri (below) blew the whistle on Chris LaRiche (top)

“If you don’t have legal status, our legal department can help you get a work permit,” the ad promised.

Cabrera, a squat 35-year-old woman with thin eyebrows and layers of makeup that can’t cover the years of wear on her face, has been living illegally in the United States since 2000, when she left Ecuador to find a job that would pay more than $5 a day.

She dialed the number from the ad and spoke with Chris LaRiche, a local businessman who said that he helped immigrants find work and attain legal status. LaRiche invited Cabrera to his office so they could review her situation.

The Fifth Street Towers impressed Cabrera. With their gilded escalators and gorgeous skyway, the downtown skyscrapers were a far cry from the dingy shops in the barrio.

Cabrera was less sure what to make of LaRiche, a short, baby-faced man in his late thirties who wore a dark dress shirt and yellow construction boots. He claimed to be “European” with an Argentinean grandparent.

Dozens of other immigrants huddled in LaRiche’s office that day. He would bring them into his quarters in small groups for consultations. When Cabrera walked into his office, LaRiche explained how he could help her family get papers.

“He said that he had a contact with immigration, ‘Mike,'” Cabrera remembers.

If the Cabreras wanted LaRiche’s help, they’d have to make an appointment next week and bring $500 each to initiate the process—a fee he said was a relative bargain.

“If you get an attorney, they will charge you $10,000,” LaRiche said.

Patricia returned the next week with her husband, Mario, a nephew, Geronimo, and plenty of questions. LaRiche pulled out a binder bursting with documents—”cases,” he said, that he’d successfully processed for illegal immigrants.

“I fixed these guys,” LaRiche said, indicating one stack of papers. Then, pointing to another stack, he added, “These guys I couldn’t help because they gave me fake papers.”

LaRiche courted the Cabreras with piles of documents, flashing government websites to give them a glimpse at the application process and teasing them with copies of what he said were work permits. He was a persistent suitor.

“I’m not lying to you,” LaRiche said, massaging their concerns. “If I were lying to you, I wouldn’t be here. The police would’ve come here for me a long time ago.”

In the end, the Cabreras trusted LaRiche, paying him $1,350 each, totaling $4,050, for the promise of work permits for the family.

“If you don’t get papers, I’ll return the money,” LaRiche guaranteed.

The Cabreras waited patiently, expecting to receive their documents in the mail on a Tuesday. They thought everything was going fine until that Tuesday came and went without the paperwork arriving. When another week passed without word from immigration, the Cabreras became nervous and called LaRiche, who assured them the permits were in the mail.

Worried, Patricia went to Pillsbury House, a south Minneapolis nonprofit. She was directed to a local immigration attorney, David Wilson, who had already heard of LaRiche.

When LaRiche heard that the Cabreras had spoken to an attorney about him, he was furious.

LaRiche warned: “I’ll send your husband to ICE and you’ll never get papers!”

LARICHE IS PART OF a burgeoning criminal enterprise: immigration scams. Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington filed a petition with the Federal Trade Commission in 2009 documenting a “widespread” and “increasing” trend of scams targeting immigrants.

“Until we filed the petition for Catholic Charities, there was no government agency that was trying to address this problem,” says David Zetoony, the attorney representing the organization. “Nobody was trying to quantify this as a problem or count the people who had been victimized and realized it. Most of these people were simply falling through the cracks.”

The Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, and the FTC launched a national campaign last June to crack down on immigration scams. Since the program began, the federal government has received 1,200 formal complaints of immigration scams, says Tom Carter, national coordinator of the government’s initiative. But the crime often goes underreported due to language barriers and immigrants’ fear of police.

“For the most part, we believe consumers that are victims of this are trying to do the right thing,” explains Carter. “They’re trying to file for some benefit they think they’re qualified for.”

Even with the feds paying attention to the issue, the problem is still “pervasive” across the country and in Minnesota, according to Michele Garnett McKenzie, the director of advocacy at the Advocates for Human Rights in Minneapolis.

“We have people coming in who have been victims of this sort of behavior on a fairly regular basis,” McKenzie said.

Local immigration attorneys say notarios—Spanish for a type of attorney that does not exist in the United States—can damage an immigrant’s case to remain in the country. Government lawyers take false, incomplete, or misleading information in immigration applications very seriously.


Bogus Church Isn’t a Lawyer, Texas Says

Posted on by Ruby Powers in Immigration Law, Immigration or Notario Fraud Leave a comment

Bogus Church Isn’t a Lawyer, Texas Says

August 24, 2011

By CAMERON LANGFORD

HOUSTON (CN) – Texas says a woman is practicing immigration law without a license, telling suckers she can legalize them as religious workers if they join her “church” – and that at least 300 people have fallen for it.

     The Texas attorney general sued Yolanda Salazar Perez and her “church,” Nueva Uncion, or the New Anointing Biblical Institute, and three of her alleged cohorts, who are members of her family, in Harris County Court.

People need to be very careful of scams. There are people out there who say they can ‘fill out a form’ for you. Immigration is not just ‘filing out forms.’ There is law to it.  Be careful.

Ruby L. Powers

US Immigration Attorney

www.RubyPowersLaw.com


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