TOP 12 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE PROVISIONAL WAIVER RULE – I-601A WAIVER

Posted on by Ruby Powers in Consular Processing, I-601 Waivers, I-601A Waivers, Immigration Law, Immigration or Notario Fraud, Immigration Trends, Processing of Applications and Petitions 1 Comment

By Ruby L. Powers – Provisional Waiver Attorney – January 4, 2013

  1. Final rule published January 3, 2013 and USCIS will start accepting I-601A waiver (provisional waivers) on March 4, 2013
  2. Only applies if the applicant’s qualifying relative is a US citizen spouse or parent.
  3. Only applied if the applicant’s ground of inadmissibility will be unlawful presence.
  4. Applicants still have to leave the US to follow through with the consular processing and waiver. Please note: this rule doesn’t keep the applicant from leaving and triggering a bar but it does diminish the time abroad.
  5. As per the form and instructions, applicants can apply for the provisional waiver more than once.
  6. If an applicant is at the National Visa Center stage, they must notify NVC of plans to apply for the provisional waiver rule.  One must notify the NVC as soon as the fee bills have been paid, by emailing NVCi601a@state.gov.
  7. If an applicant has had a visa interview scheduled, to be able to still submit a provisional waiver a new visa petition ( a new I-130) must be filed and one must ask the Consulate to cancel the registration of the previous immigrant visa case.
  8. If an applicant is in removal proceedings,  has their case administratively closed, has no calendared hearing in the future,  AND otherwise qualify, an applicant can submit a provisional waiver
  9. Only USCIS can adjudicate the I-601A waiver (not immigration court)
  10. An applicant should only file a provisional waiver if they don’t have any criminal history that would make them inadmissible. Therefore, one must consult with an immigration attorney if the applicant has any criminal history and wants to pursue this.
  11. After the I-601A waiver is approved, it is expected that the visa appointment in the applicant’s home country will be 2-3 months afterwards.
  12. If the Consulate at the visa appointment determines the applicant has other grounds of inadmissibility, an approved provisional waiver is automatically revoked.

 

The Law Office of Ruby L. Powers is located in Houston, Texas helping clients around the US and world with their US Federal Immigration needs.
Please beware of ‘notarios’ unlawfully practicing law as it is illegal and they often do not suffer the consequences of their actions as much as the applicants do who use them. The author sees this time and time again via her legal consultations with clients who have cases made more difficult to solve by notario actions.Immigration attorneys and immigrants are grateful for this opportunity by DHS!

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LAS 12 COSAS MAS IMPORTANTES QUE DEBE SABER SOBRE LA REGLA DE PERDON PROVISIONAL – PERDON 1-601A

  1. La norma final fue publicada el 3 de Enero del 2013 y el USCIS comenzara a aceptar el perdón I-610A (perdón provisional) el 4 de Marzo del 2013. 
  2. Este perdón solo aplica si el pariente calificado (madre, padre o esposo(a)) es ciudadano(a) American(a).
  3. Este perdón solo aplica si el motivo de inadmisibilidad del cliente es la presencia ilegal.
  4. Los solicitantes deben salir de los EE.UU. para seguir adelante con el proceso consular y perdón. Nota: esta regla no impide que al quitar el país se active el “bar” por haber residido en este ilegalmente pero si disminuye el tiempo que el solicitante debe estar en el extranjero.
  5. De acuerdo con el formulario y sus instrucciones, los aspirantes pueden solicitar el perdón provisional más de una vez.
  6. Si el solicitante se encuentra en la fase de Centro Nacional de Visas, este debe notificar al CNV sobre sus planes de aplicar al perdón provisional. Se debe notificar al CNV tan pronto como las cuotas hayan sido pagadas, por correo electrónico a NVCi610@state.gov.
  7. Si el solicitante ya tiene una entrevista programada, este deberá presentar una nueva solicitud de visa (una I-130 nueva) para poder solicitar el perdón provisional, así como pedir al Consulado cancelar cualquier petición de visa previa.
  8. Si el solicitante se encuentra en proceso de deportación, tiene un caso admirativamente cerrado, no tiene una audiencia programada en el futuro, y califica de otra manera, este puede aplicar a un perdón provisional.
  9. Solo USCIS puede adjudicar el perdón I-601A (no la corte de inmigración).
  10. El solicitante debe presentar una exención provisional solamente si no tiene antecedentes penales que lo harían de otra forma inadmisible. Por lo tanto, se debe consultar con un abogado de inmigración si el solicitante tiene antecedentes penales y quiere continuar con el proceso.
  11. Una vez que el perdón I.601A sea aprobado, se espera que la cita para la visa sea programada para 2 o 3 meses después en el país de origen del solicitante.
  12. Si el Consulado, en la cita para la visa, determina que existen otros motivos para la inadmisibilidad del solicitante, el perdón provisional aprobado es automáticamente revocado.

 Escrito por Ruby L. Powers, Abogada de I-601A/ Perdón Provisional

Oficina Jurídica de  Ruby L. Powers

Houston, Texas ayudando a clientes alrededor de los EE.UU. y el mundo con sus necesidades Migratorias Federales en los Estados Unidos.

 

 


Provisional Unlawful Presence Waiver announcement – January 3, 2013

Posted on by Ruby Powers in Consular Processing, I-601 Waivers, Immigration Trends, Legislative Reform, State and Local Immigration Rules Leave a comment

After a year of waiting all of 2012, we have it folks! The provisional unlawful presence waiver is being published today, January 3, 2013 and will become effective on March 4, 2013 (60 days later).

For more info

Secretary Napolitano Announces Final Rule to Support Family Unity During Waiver Process

Release Date:
January 2, 2013

For Immediate Release
DHS Press Office
Contact: 202-282-8010

WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano today announced the posting of a final rule in the Federal Register that reduces the time U.S. citizens are separated from their immediate relatives (spouse, children and parents), who are in the process of obtaining visas to become lawful permanent residents of the United States under certain circumstances. The final rule establishes a process that allows certain individuals to apply for a provisional unlawful presence waiver before they depart the United States to attend immigrant visa interviews in their countries of origin. The process will be effective on March 4, 2013 and more information about the filing process will be made available in the coming weeks at http://www.uscis.gov/.

“This final rule facilitates the legal immigration process and reduces the amount of time that U.S. citizens are separated from their immediate relatives who are in the process of obtaining an immigrant visa,” said Secretary Napolitano.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) received more than 4,000 comments in response to the April 2, 2012 proposed rule and considered all of them in preparing the final rule.

“The law is designed to avoid extreme hardship to U.S. citizens, which is precisely what this rule achieves,” USCIS Director Mayorkas said. “The change will have a significant impact on American families by greatly reducing the time family members are separated from those they rely upon.”

Under current law, immediate relatives of U.S. citizens who are not eligible to adjust status in the United States to become lawful permanent residents must leave the U.S. and obtain an immigrant visa abroad. Individuals who have accrued more than six months of unlawful presence while in the United States must obtain a waiver to overcome the unlawful presence inadmissibility bar before they can return to the United States after departing to obtain an immigrant visa. Under the existing waiver process, which remains available to those who do not qualify for the new process, immediate relatives cannot file a waiver application until after they have appeared for an immigrant visa interview abroad and the Department of State has determined that they are inadmissible. 

In order to obtain a provisional unlawful presence waiver, the applicant must be an immediate relative of a U.S. citizen, inadmissible only on account of unlawful presence, and demonstrate the denial of the waiver would result in extreme hardship to his or her U.S. citizen spouse or parent. USCIS will publish a new form, Form I-601A, Application for a Provisional Unlawful Presence Waiver, for individuals to use when applying for a provisional unlawful presence waiver under the new process.

Under the new provisional waiver process, immediate relatives must still depart the United States for the consular immigrant visa process; however, they can apply for a provisional waiver before they depart for their immigrant visa interview abroad. Individuals who file the Form I-601A must notify the Department of State’s National Visa Center that they are or will be seeking a provisional waiver from USCIS. The new process will reduce the amount of time U.S. citizen are separated from their qualifying immediate relatives. Details on the process changes are available at http://www.regulations.gov/.

For more information, visit www.uscis.gov.


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